About the Society

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The Supreme Court of Louisiana Historical Society is a private non-profit 501(c)(3) organization, which was incorporated in the State of Louisiana in 1992.  The Society is dedicated to the collection and preservation of the history of the Supreme Court of Louisiana and its decisions for the purpose of increasing public awareness of the Court’s contribution to Louisiana’s rich legal heritage.

Member contributions have allowed The Historical Society to open the Louisiana Supreme Court Museum, to restore and reopen the stunning Supreme Court building at 400 Royal Street, and to restore dozens of portraits of Louisiana Judges of historical significance. Membership is open to the public, as is the museum.

 

 

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Fun Facts

Louisiana Supreme Court Justices who were also State Governors

  • Pierre Auguste Bourguignon Derbigny – 1828-1829 (Whig; National Republican)
  • Francis T. Nicholls – 1877-1880, 1888-1892 (Democrat)
  • Samuel Douglas McEnery – 1881-1888 (Democrat)
  • Newton C. Blanchard – 1904-1908 (Democrat)
  • Robert F. Kennon – 1952-1956 (Democrat)

(Dates are terms of governorship)

 

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News and Events

Louis D. Curet

SCLAHS Mourns the Passing of Board Member Louis D. Curet

Louis D. Curet, loyal Board Member and Chairman of the Supreme Court of Louisiana Historical Society Membership Committee, passed away on Thursday, June 9, 2016, surrounded by his family. SCLAHS President Donna D. Fraiche, on behalf of its Board, expressed …

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The Law Library of Louisiana hosts ‘Freedom Rides’ exhibit– created as a companion to a PBS documentary

The Louisiana Law Library, housed in the Louisiana Supreme Court, hosted a six-panel display telling the story of the Freedom Rides. The exhibit, created by the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History in partnership with the PBS history series “American …

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Judge Cassibry Exhibit and Statue

In 1999, Act 708 was passed by the Louisiana State Legislature naming the city block on which the Louisiana Supreme Court Building sits as the Judge Fred J. Cassibry Square.  The Act states that two memorial plaques would be placed …

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